Dae Rebeck Sanchez

Dae Rebeck Sanchez
King of Prussia, PA

Contact info

http://www.daerebeck.com
https://www.etsy.com/shop/CircusAbandon
mail@ daerebeck.com

Artist Bio  & Statement

Dae Rebeck Sanchez is a fine artist who has shown in museums, galleries, art centers and fine art festivals regionally and nationally. Dae works primarily with acrylic paints, photo based transfers, and collage on wood panel. Her narrative, sometimes surreal layered paintings focus on big skies, the circus, urban/suburban decay, belly dance, and pattern. Born in New Jersey, but currently residing in Pennsylvania, She studied at The Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico and Moore College of Art in Philadelphia. Dae has won “Best in Oil and Acrylics” at the 2009 Chestnut Hill Arts Festival and “Best in Mixed Media” at the 2007 Manayunk Arts Festival. She is a published art writer and teaches workshops and classes. Dae has been commissioned to create many unique photo based art portraits for her clients. To learn more about Dae and her art: Visit her at http://www.daerebeck.com and http://www.circusabandon.etsy.com.

As a mixed media artist I use the word “paint” to encompass what I do, but it involves different techniques and processes. Photography is a significant contributor. While I have been painting and drawing since childhood, I began using photography in my early 20’s, after I discovered the self-portraits of my great-great grandfather, a turn of the century hobbyist photographer, performing magician, and ventriloquist. Unbeknownst to many, he was half Native American. He became a strong influence in my own search for identity and to honor him I chose to explore his.

I studied at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico. My experience there had a profound effect on my work and ideas. There, the sky would become so significant to me. In New Mexico the sky is a living entity constantly moving, changing, and breathing. Here in the crowded treed east this realization was not fully possible. I needed that space and landscape to “see” it. The primarily Native American faculty fostered a great love of exploration. They approached different materials to tell a personal and expressive story. This philosophy reinforced what I always felt art should be about and was a good fit for my mixed media inclinations.

At Moore College, I focused primarily on painting, collage and photo transfer while continuing with the identity self-portraits. I began trying to create a sort of stylistic surrealism by combining the photo-based imagery with the hand painted. Together, they create a unique environment of the expected fused with surprise. I try to capture this feeling in my work and commissions. The extensive collection of Christian Iconography at the PMA also fostered a great love of gold leaf, the portraits of saints, and iconic images.

Living in the Philadelphia region again, my love of abandoned buildings reawakened. As a child I would create “constructed” drawings of houses and boats. I would draw them wooden plank by wooden plank, something akin to a hobo shanty, with patchwork wood and metal scraps. Fascinated with dilapidated buildings, layered billboards, and old frescoes, the manmade interacts with the environment and takes on a weathered quality that I find more beautiful because of its imperfections. Subtleties beneath the surface are revealed and as a result the surface becomes obscure. I approach my work this way with buried layers. I unearth them with sandpaper and a razor blade like topical archaeology.

Being a mother has moved me to confront my own childhood so I am periodically revisiting the “Circus”. My search for identity still continues… I am embracing my Scotch-Irish-Pennsylvania-coal-mining-roots and looking for my other paternal great-great grandfather’s fresco paintings on the ceilings of old Philadelphia if I can find any that remain. Over the past few years I have spent much of my creative time involved with belly dance, but I feel a shift in that direction for me, turning me back to more fine art creations verses dance.

Circus Abandon
Circus Abandon
Kenhurst
Kenhurst
Pagoda of Weeds
Pagoda of Weeds
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